NEW!

Big Questions in Creativity 2016

Edited by Paul D. Reali & Cynthia Burnett

Because it demands reimagining, reconsideration, and redefinition, change is an essential part of creativity. And in Big Questions in Creativity 2016, the field’s newest thinkers tackle some of its most intriguing questions in the the areas of personal, organizational, and cultural change. This collection represents the year’s 10 best papers from the International Center for Studies in Creativity at SUNY Buffalo State, and provides a peek in the window of the world’s first Master of Science degree in creativity. As professional facilitators, artists, educators, and change leaders, these authors work to engender creativity in others. The questions they ask—and the answers they find—are key to understanding what creativity is now, and what it may well be in the future.   

Where to Get It
  • Print Edition, $19.95, at amazon.combarnesandnoble.com, or directly from ICSC Press (which gets you a little something extra for free).
  • PDF Edition, $4.95, coming soon
  • Kindle Edition, $4.95, coming soon
  • Library and Tax Exempt Sales: call 716-253-1871 or email editor (at)  icscpress.com

What's in the Book?

Organizational Creativity: 

  • Andrés Mejía-Villa: What might be the design of a new generation of innovation models?
  • Celia Pillai: How can organizations motivate employees towards creativity?
  • Diane R. Bessel: Collaborative problem solving: What helps or hinders its usefulness in creative efforts?
  • Karina Loera Barcenas: How does creative leadership pave the way for successful entrepreneurs?

Personal Creativity

  • Lina Pugsley : How can parents fan the spark of their children’s creativity?
  • Molly Holinger: Why is creativity in the self-help section?
  • Rebecca DiLiberto: How can spiritual intelligence help us cultivate creative potential? 

Creativity & Social Capital

  • Mattia Miani: Does culture affect creativity? An integrative literature review
  • Serap Gurak Ozdemir: Do teachers value creativity?
  • Virginia L. Bernd: How can teaching creative thinking increase the social capital of our aging population?